Understanding ritual trauma: A comparison of findings from three online surveys

http://ritualabuse.us/mindcontrol/eas-studies/understanding-ritual-trauma-a-comparison-of-findings-from-three-online-surveys/

Handout

for

Karriker, Wanda. (2008, November). Understanding ritual trauma: A comparison of findings from three online surveys. Paper presented at the meeting of the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation, Chicago, IL.

A pdf copy of this paper can be received by writing sandime@twave.net

10 Extreme Abuse Survey Findings Helpful to Understanding Ritual Trauma

1. Ritual abuse/mind control (RA/MC) is a global phenomenon.

2. A diagnosis of Dissociative Identity Disorder is common for persons who report histories of

RA/MC. (84% of EAS respondents who answered that they have been diagnosed with DID [N=655] reported that they are survivors of RA/MC).

3. Ritual abuse (RA) is not limited to SRA, i.e., satanic ritual abuse, sadistic abuse, satanist abuse.

4. RA is reported to involve mind control techniques.

5. Some extreme abuse survivors report that they were used in government-sponsored mind control experimentation (GMC).

6. RA/MC is reported to be involved in organized “known” crime.

7. RA/MC is reported to be involved in clergy abuse.

8. Most often reported memories of extreme abuse are similar across all surveys.

9. Most often reported possible aftereffects of extreme abuse are similar across all surveys.

10. In rating the effectiveness of healing methods, therapists tend to favor stabilization techniques; survivors are more open to alternative ways to cope with indoctrinated belief systems.

1. Ritual abuse/mind control (RA/MC) is a global phenomenon.

Extreme Abuse Survey (EAS) for Adult Survivors (An International Online Survey for Adult Survivors of Extreme Abuse) January 1 – March 31, 2007

2337 persons viewed the survey; 1719 in English, 618 in German.

1471 persons answered at least one question on the survey.

31 countries were declared: United States (774); Germany (273); United Kingdom (92); Canada (75); Australia (38); Switzerland (13); Israel (11); Norway (10); Netherlands (8); Austria (8); New Zealand (6); South Africa (6); Greece (5); Sweden (4); Armenia (3); India (3); Spain (2); France (2); Colombia (2); Belgium (1); Bulgaria (1); Czech Republic (1); Ireland (1); Italy (1); Romania (1); China (1); Hong Kong (1); Kyrgzstan (1); Mexico (1); Malaysia (1); Saudi Arabia (1)

124 respondents did not name a country of residence.

1190 respondents gave their primary languages: English (852); German (256); Dutch (21); Norwegian (10); Hebrew (6); French (6); Greek (5); Swedish (4); Italian (3); Spanish (3); Afrikaans (3); Polish (3); Turkish (2); Estonian (2); Tamil (2); Chinese Simplified (2); Romanian (1); Azerbaijani (1); Bengali (1); Georgian (1); Czech (1); Finnish (1); Korean (1); Persian (1); Armenian (1); Pashto (1). 281 respondents did not name their primary languages.

Professional – Extreme Abuse Survey (P-EAS)

(An International Online Survey for Therapists, Counselors, Clergy and Other Persons Who Have Worked Professionally With At Least One Adult Survivor of Extreme Abuse)

April 1, 2007 – June 30, 2007

656 persons viewed the survey; 458 in English, 198 in German.

451 persons answered at least one question on the survey.

20 countries were declared: United States (205); Germany (99); United Kingdom (59); Canada (21); Netherlands (9); New Zealand (4); Switzerland (4); Norway (4); Israel (4); Australia (3); Greece (3); Ireland (2); Philippines (2); Belgium (1); Italy (1); Romania (1); Sweden (1); South Africa (1); Ecuador (1); Hungary (1).

24 respondents did not name a country of residence.

389 respondents gave their primary languages: English (265); Germany (88); Dutch (18); Greek (4); Norwegian (4); Filipino (2); Spanish (2); Hebrew (2); Romanian (1); Hungarian (1); Italian (1); Swedish (1). 62 respondents did not name their primary languages.

Child – Extreme Abuse Survey (C-EAS)

(An International Online Survey for Caregivers of Child Survivors of Ritual Abuse and Mind Control)

July 8, 2007 – October 8, 2007

395 persons viewed the survey; 262 in English, 133 in German.

264 persons answered at least one question on the survey.

19 countries were declared: United States (116); Germany (67); UK (24); Canada (12); Armenia (4); New Zealand (3); France (2); Australia (2); Netherlands (2); Peru (1); Philippines (1); Poland (1); Portugal (1); Switzerland (1); Hungary (1); Israel (1); Turkey (1); Venezuela (1); South Africa (1).

22 respondents did not name a country of residence.

222 respondents gave their primary languages: English (148); German (57); Dutch (6); Spanish (4); Faroese (1); Polish (1); Amharic (1); Hungarian (1); Armenian (1); Afrikaans (1); Frisian (1). 42 respondents did not name their primary languages.


2. A diagnosis of Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) is common for persons who report histories of RA/MC.

EAS: 84% of EAS respondents who answered that they have been diagnosed with DID [N=655]

reported that they are survivors of RA/MC).

P-EAS: 85% of professionals who answered the question answered “yes” to “The majority of

adult RA/MC survivors with whom I have worked have met the diagnostic criteria for (DID).”

C-EAS: 84% of caregivers who answered the question answered “yes” to “Child dissociates when

talking or questioned about abuse.”

74% of caregivers who answered the question said at least one of the children in their care

had received a diagnosis of DID.

3. RA is not limited to SRA, i.e., satanic or sadistic or satanist abuse.

EAS: Numbers in parentheses represent total number of respondents for each category of ritually abusive groups presented on the EAS. Percents represent the frequencies of “yes” responses to each category. (Respondents were not given an opportunity to write in other groups.)

Satanic cult 55% (986)

Gnostic-occult 14% (969)

Child pornography group 48% (977)

Religious sect 39% (993)

*Fascist group 22% (998)

Uncertain ideology 47% (994)

Witchcraft cult 23% (971)

Voodooism 7% (966)

*(group that considers itself superior in race, creed, or origin, e. g., Neo-Nazi, White Supremacist and KKK)

P-EAS: Respondents have worked with survivors who have reported ritual abuse not only in groups named by EAS respondents (above) but also in day-care centers and by polygamist and clergy groups. (Respondents were not given an opportunity to write in other groups.)

C-EAS: In addition to groups named by EAS and P-EAS respondents, children have disclosed to their caregivers that they have been victims of RA/MC by the following perpetrator groups:

Child trafficking group, Fraternal organization, Government-sponsored mind control “experimenters,” Juvenile satanic group, Mainstream religious group, Non government-sponsored mind control “experimenters,” Organized crime group, Organized pedophile group, Private school employees, Public school employees, Santeria group, Vampirism group.

Respondents were given an opportunity to write in other groups and added the following:

Aboriginal witchcraft, Hell’s Angels, Family members, BDSM community, Illuminati, Military, Mormon, Offenders followed ‘Thelema’ and the doctrines of Alistair Crowley, Saturnuskult (Cult of Saturnus), Scout association, US government employees, Whole small towns).


4. RA is reported to involve mind control techniques.

EAS: Respondents were asked to select the category of extreme abuse that best describes their experiences as survivors. 987 persons responded to the question. Listed below are the categories and the number and percent of survivors who chose each category.

Ritual Abuse (RA) ……………………………………. 191 (19%)

Mind Control (MC) …………………………………… 69 (07%)

Ritual Abuse and Mind Control (RA-MC) …………..513 (52%)

Other Extreme Abuse (EA) …………………………..214 (22%)

Number of respondents reported the following experiences with MC:

766 Dealing with programs installed by perpetrators.

848 Possible aftereffects are a result of beliefs indoctrinated by perpetrators.

640 Perpetrator(s) deliberately created/programmed dissociative states of mind (such as

alters, personalities, ego- states) in them.

415 MC programming was used by a handler for blackmail or personal use.

175 Trained to become assassins.

203 Training designed to develop psychic abilities.

P-EAS: Number of respondents who checked each percentage in answering:

“Of individuals reporting memories consistent with RA/MC, I believe that the following percentage actually experienced mind control.”

14 Zero

24 1 to 10%

9 11 to 20%

2 21 to 30%

6 31 to 40%

10 41 to 50%

9 51 to 60%

13 61 to 70%

14 71 to 80%

20 81 to 90%

107 91 to 100%

34 Don’t know

14 No answer

C-EAS: 41(45%) of 92 caregivers who answered the related question said that one or more children for whom they had provided care had reported non-consensual mind control experimentation.

A common mind control technique is called “Don’t Talk; Don’t Tell” Programming.”

EAS: 77% of adult survivors who responded to the related question had been threatened with death if they ever talked about the abuse.

P-EAS: 93% of professionals who responded to the related question had worked with at least

one survivor who had been threatened with death if he or she ever talked about the abuse.

C-EAS 80% of child caregivers who responded to the related question had heard a child say they

had been threatened with death if he or she ever talked about the abuse.

5. Some extreme abuse survivors report that they were used in government-sponsored mind control experimentation (GMC).

EAS: 257 respondents reported that secret mind control experiments were used on them as children.

One of the EAS findings is particularly relevant to anecdotal reports that government experimenters went to the already existing satanic covens to get some of their subjects – children who had already learned the lessons of dissociation.

Of 543 survivors who reported that they had been abused in a satanic cult –

33% or 179

reported being used in secret mind control experiments as children.

Of 257 survivors who reported that secret mind control experiments were used on them as children –

69% or 177

reported abuse in a satanic cult.

See Media Packet on the Presentations section of our website for documentation that torture-based, government-sponsored mind control experimentation was conducted on children during the Cold War.

6. RA/MC is reported to be involved in organized “known” crime.

The analysis below is published in:

Becker, T., Karriker, W., Overkamp, B., & Rutz, C. (2008). The Extreme Abuse Survey: Preliminary findings regarding dissociative identity disorder. In A. Sachs and G. Galton (Eds.), Forensic aspects of dissociative identity disorder (pp. 32-49). London: Karnac.)

Ideologically Motivated Crimes (IMC) Addressed in the Surveys

If perpetrated in ritualistic settings, a sample of 10 identical items from both the EAS and P-EAS and ten similar items from the C-EAS could be classified as ideologically motivated crimes. A statistical analysis of responses across surveys for these items was conducted using chi-square tests. The purpose of this procedure was to determine whether the distribution of “yes,” “don’t know,” and “no” responses was the same for extreme abuse survivors who reported each memory, professionals who have worked with at least one survivor reporting the memory, and caregivers of at least one child survivor of RA/MC who had made a verbal disclosure of the crime. Results indicate statistically significant differences among these groups in the frequencies of reports of these crimes (all p < .01).

Listed below are the total number (N) who responded to these items and the percent of “yes” responses by each survey group. A comparison of these distributions suggests that the main difference in responses across groups is the higher percentages of “yes” responses by professionals. This is a reasonable conclusion given that the majority of P-EAS respondents report having worked with more than one survivor of RA/MC and thus would have more opportunities to hear reports of ideologically motivated crimes.

EAS                      P-EAS          C-EAS

Item                                                                N         %            N     %          N     %

Receiving physical abuse from perpetrators              1093   88          216   97          90   82

Sexual abuse by multiple perpetrators                      1090   82          217   95          91   77

Forced drugging                                                        1077   73          221   88          88   70

Witnessing murder by perpetrators                           1057   56          218   77          96   43

Forced to participate in animal mutilations/killings 1059   55          218   78          92   59

Pornography (child)                                                   1059   55          220   82          83   53

Forced participation in murder by perpetrators         1040   48          220   70          90   42

Prostitution (child)                                                    1045   48          218   77          79   25

Forced impregnation                                                 1041   40          220   71          82   33

Survivor’s own child murdered by his/her perpetrators1021   26   217   55          82   18

7. RA/MC is reported to be involved in clergy abuse.

EAS: 438 respondents reported that at least one spiritual leader was involved in their RA/MC.

P-EAS: Number of respondents (N) who have worked with survivors of RA by clergy and number of persons (n) they have seen:

N n

67 Zero

50 One

59 2 – 10

9 11 – 20

19 More than 20

17 Don’t know

3 No answer

C-EAS: 14 caregivers have heard children mention Catholic priests as perpetrators

16 have heard Protestant clergy mentioned

6 have heard rabbis mentioned

19 have heard other religious leaders mentioned

8. Most often reported memories of extreme abuse are similar across all surveys.

EAS: (1) Receiving physical abuse from perpetrators

(2) Sexual abuse by multiple perpetrators

(3) Other abuses

(4) Being threatened with death if survivor ever talked about the abuse

(5) Witnessing physical abuse by perpetrators on other victims

P-EAS: (1) Receiving physical abuse from perpetrators

(2) Sexual abuse by multiple perpetrators

(3) Being threatened with death if survivor ever talked about the abuse

(4) Incest

(5) Witnessing physical abuse by perpetrators on other victims

C-EAS: (1) Receiving physical abuse/torture from multiple perpetrators

(2) Witnessing physical abuse on other victims

(3) Being threatened with death if survivor ever talked about the abuse

(4) Witnessing sexual abuse on other victims

(5) Sexual abuse by multiple perpetrators

9. Most often reported aftereffects of extreme abuse are similar across all surveys.

EAS: (1) Sleep problems

(2) PTSD

(3) Painful body memories

(4) Unusual fears

(5) Indoctrinated beliefs

P-EAS: (1) PTSD

(2) Sleep problems

(3) Painful body memories

(4) Unusual fears

(5) Self-mutilating behaviors

C-EAS: (1) Nightmares, night terrors

(2) Depression

(3) PTSD

(4) Excessive fears, phobias

(5) Impulse control problems

10. In rating the effectiveness of healing methods, therapists tend to favor stabilization techniques; survivors are more open to alternative ways to cope with indoctrinated belief systems.

From:

Karriker, W. (2008, November). Healing methods: Comparing ratings by trauma survivors and trauma therapists. Poster session presented at the at the annual meeting of the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation, Chicago, IL.)

Significant differences in effectiveness ratings by survivors and by therapists were shown for 43 of the healing methods under study. The largest discrepancies (10+ percentage points) between survivors’ and therapists’ ratings of “much help” or “great help” were on the following items:

EAS: Survivors’ ratings higher: Supportive Friends, Other Method(s), Formal Deprogramming, Theophostic Prayer, Deliverance, Internet Support Group, Reading Survivor Stories, Chiropractic, Exorcism, Reiki, Confronting Abusers, Music Therapy, Energy Therapies, Massage Therapy, Homeopathy, Aromatherapy

P-EAS: Therapists’ ratings higher: Individual Psychotherapy/Counseling, Grounding Techniques, Self-care/Self-soothing Techniques, Supportive Family Members, Non-suicide Contract with Therapist, EMDR, Art Therapy

Individual Psychotherapy/Counseling was rated by both survey groups as most effective; Electroshock Therapy was rated by both groups as least effective.

Related Publications by Extreme Abuse Survey Team Members

Becker, T. (2008). Re-searching for new perspectives: Ritual abuse/ritual violence as ideologically motivated crime. In R. Noblitt & P. Noblitt (Eds.), Ritual abuse in the twenty-first century (pp. 237-260). Bandon, OR: Robert D. Reed.

Becker, T., Karriker, W., Overkamp, B., & Rutz, C. (2008). The Extreme Abuse Survey: Preliminary findings regarding dissociative identity disorder. In A. Sachs and G. Galton (Eds.), Forensic aspects of dissociative identity disorder (pp. 32-49). London: Karnac.

Karriker, W. (2007). Morning, come quickly. (A novel about the aftereffects of extreme child abuse and the resiliency of the human spirit).Catawba, NC: Sandime.

Rutz, C., Becker, T., Overkamp, B., & Karriker, W. (2008). Exploring commonalities reported by adult survivors of extreme abuse: Preliminary empirical findings. (pp. 31-84). In R. Noblitt & P. Noblitt.(Eds.). Ritual abuse in the twenty-first century. Bandon, OR: Robert D. Reed.

Rutz, C. (2001). A nation betrayed: The chilling true story of secret Cold War experiments performed on our children and other innocent people. Grass Lake, MI: Fidelity Publishing.

Website

http://extreme-abuse-survey.net/

On this site are links to the original surveys, to frequencies of responses to every question on each survey, and to publications and presentations based on the survey data.

Contact

Wanda Karriker: sandime@twave.net

Advertisements

Tags: , , ,


%d bloggers like this: