Archive for December, 2008

ritual abuse diagnosis research

December 23, 2008

http://ritualabuse.us/ritualabuse/studies/ritual-abuse-diagnosis-research-2/

The following is an excerpt from a chapter in: Lacter, E. & Lehman, K. (2008). Guidelines to Differential Diagnosis between Schizophrenia and Ritual Abuse/Mind Control Traumatic Stress. In J.R. Noblitt & P. Perskin (Eds.), Ritual Abuse in the Twenty-first Century: Psychological, Forensic, Social and Political Considerations, pp. 85-154. Bandon, Oregon: Robert D. Reed Publishers.

this page describes ritual abuse crimes

01. Leavitt and Labott (2000) compared Rorschach results of three groups of patients; 1) patients reporting child sexual abuse within Satanic cults; 2) patients reporting child sexual abuse without ritual abuse; and 3) non-abused patients. The first two groups had histories of amnesia for their sexual trauma, memory recovery after the age of 18 years, and an absence of psychotic or neurologic symptoms. Groups were compared for frequency of 41 Rorschach content responses related to Satanic ritual abuse, selected by four experts in ritual trauma. The group of patients reporting abuse within Satanic cults gave significantly more Rorschach responses with Satanic content. The following specific percepts significantly differentiated the groups: robe, mask, body mutilated, babies damaged, ritual ceremony, threatening eyes, blood everywhere, special knife, goat reference, bondage, torture, sacrifice, hooded figure, altar, blood rituals, and circle. A second study revealed that these results were unrelated to patients’ degree of media and hospital milieu exposure to the subject of Satanic ritual abuse. In fact, less media exposure was associated with production of more Satanic content in patients reporting ritual abuse, evidence that reports of ritual abuse are not primarily the product of exposure contagion.

In an earlier study, Leavitt and Labott (1998a) found that patients reporting Satanic ritual abuse provided more Satanic-content responses in a word association test than patients reporting non-ritual sexual abuse. They also provided fewer normative responses, understandable given the pervasive nature of ritual trauma and the paucity of normal childhood experience for so many of these victims.

Mangen (1992) performed approximately 25 psychological evaluations with patients already identified as having been victimized within Satanic cults, including the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R), Rorschach, Thematic Apperception Test (TAT) or other story-telling test, a human figure drawings, and more.

Mangen found that the “testing” situation itself often induced great fear in these patients, related to the frequent “tests” of abilities within ritual abuse. Test stimuli, even benign or familiar stimuli, often acted as trauma reminders and precipitated trauma reactions and dissociative “switching” of personalities. He observed that “many responses given by these patients sound blatantly psychotic” (p. 154), but closer scrutiny revealed that these were derived from the ritual abuse and the traumatized level of functioning. He explains the importance of understanding ritual abuse practices, symbols, holidays, etc., as emphasized above.

Mangen found these individuals were of at least average intelligence. However, signs of cognitive slippage and inefficiency occurred as trauma impinged on thought processes. Idiosyncratic, personalized, and even bizarre responses to test stimuli were common. E.g., intelligence tests involving numbers, and in particular, having to repeat series of numbers backwards, often disorganized patients’ responses, since numbers and reversal of numbers and letters are common in ritual practices and programming. Mangen noted that words often lost their meaning as symbols, and were perceived as dangerous in themselves, related to abusers communicating deadly messages with words, and punishment by abusers for incorrect verbal responses. Visual images also disorganized thought processes. E.g., one woman froze when given puzzle pieces of a human figure to assemble. When asked what had happened, she “switched” into a young personality who explained that she had participated in rituals involving people being cut into pieces, but had never been told to try to put the people back together.

Mangen emphasized that such disorganized episodes are frequent, but exist side-by-side with trauma-free spheres of cognitive functioning. He suggests that the traumatized thought processes are state-dependent, and that these patients readily enter states of traumatized functioning.

Mangen’s Rorschach observations are especially revealing. Patients tended to provide images that were perceptually accurate (good form); i.e., they were largely consistent with shapes in the inkblot. In contrast, patients with Schizophrenia often have poor perceptual accuracy (poor form) on the Rorschach, a sign of more impaired perceptual and thought processes.

Though form was generally adequate, associations to the blots were replete with traumatic imagery. E.g., a perception of a person might fit the blot, but the associations might include themes of cutting and murdering babies, eating flesh, evil, etc., additions that would appear bizarre if not for the ritual trauma. Such trauma-driven associations might be made with flat affect or flooded affect. In some cases, perceptual distortions (poor form) were more central, but even these were often resolved in light of the abuse. For example, one patient perceived a person with women’s breasts and a penis, an incongruous combination (INCOM) that might indicate psychosis, if not for the fact that some sexual rituals involve people costumed to appear bi-gender. Yellow was perceived by an other patient as angry and as urine “poured all over me”. This response becomes understandable if the clinician knows that abusers often urinate on the victim, in some cases with the intent to dominate the spirit of the victim with their own spirits.

Mangen explains that drawings also contain elements that would appear bizarre without an understanding of the underlying trauma. For example, trees may contain eyes, hidden people, and blood dripping from severed limbs. Moore (1994) notes that in human figure drawings of ritual abuse victims, arms often abruptly end, appear torn off or jagged, or have unusual endings unlike hands. Ritual acts, symbols, candles, pentagrams, inverted crosses, robes, dripping blood, etc., may be graphically represented, particularly if the abuse is conscious. Cohen and Cox (1995) include a series of drawings depicting the unfolding of memories of an adult woman ritually abused as a child, replete with graphic memories of abusive rituals, ritual artifacts, her terror, phallic symbols of sexual abuse, and dissociative responses, such as multiple self-representations in one drawing, and changes in developmental level across drawings in relation to the age of the personality making the picture.

Mangen reports that ritual abuse victims demonstrate a damaged experience of self on projective tests, such as the Rorschach and TAT. Responses demonstrate a lack of self-agency, that is, a sense of lack of control over one’s life and actions. Figures are often perceived as helpless or passive. Body integrity is often impaired; figures are seen as broken, devoured, harmed, etc. Self affect is inconsistent and incongruent. For example, a figure may be described as frightened and laughing, evil and good, etc. Dissociative processes are evident in illogical shifts and transpositions. TAT stories include confusion in regard to time, states of waking and sleeping, life and death, here and not here, and sudden changes in what characters know, think, and want.

TAT stories reflect interpersonal estrangement and malevolence. Themes of caring and kindness tend to be fleeting. Themes of deception and betrayal are common; “things are not what they seem”. Kind adults turn threatening. Child figures may feign compliance, but are described as actually pretending or escaping in their minds (dissociating). Responses are consistent with the devastating and pervasive abuse these victims have experienced, so often including immediate family members.

Affect dysregulation and emotional intensity pervade test responses. Primitive violent imagery related to ritual trauma is common in Rorschach responses and TAT stories. There is a paucity of positively tinged affective experiences, such as love and hope. Terror and despair dominate. Fear of annihilation and abandonment are more common than fear of loss of love. Some responses may reflect identification with aggressors.

Dissociative responses are observed throughout the evaluation process. Blocking of affect may occur as trauma is described. Overwhelming stimuli can precipitate switching of personalities. There may be obvious changes in vocal presentation and general demeanor. Personalities may identify themselves by name. They may relay accounts of horrible abuse unknown to the host and the host may return with complete amnesia for the event. Or dissociative episodes may be more subtle, and not distinguished unless the evaluator looks for amnestic gaps, such as the repetition of test questions later in the evaluation process to determine if prior responses are recalled.

Mangen explains that the patient may not be able to reveal the “secret” of the abuse and that personalities who identify with the cult experience tend not to present themselves. Thus the clinician must work with the patient to “help make the invisible visible” (p. 155). However, he states that much more research is needed on the use of psychological testing in identifying severe trauma, dissociation, and in particular ritual trauma, to help clinicians to recognize patients who are still preserving the “secret” and not yet revealing their ritual abuse.

References

Cohen, B.M., & Cox, C.T. (1995). Telling without talking: Art as a window into the world of multiple personality. New York: Norton.

Leavitt F., & Labott, S. M.(1998a). Revision of the Word Association Test for assessing associations of patients reporting Satanic ritual abuse in childhood. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 54(7), 933-943.

Leavitt, F., & Labott, S.M. (2000). The role of media and hospital exposure on Rorschach response patterns by patients reporting satanic ritual abuse. American Journal of Forensic Psychology, 18(2), 35-55.

Mangen, R. (1992). Psychological testing and ritual abuse. In D.K. Sakheim & S.E. Devine (Eds.), Out of darkness: Exploring Satanism and ritual abuse (pp. 147-173). New York: Lexington.

Moore, M.S. (1994). Common characteristics in the drawings of ritually abused children and adults. In V. Sinason (Ed.), Treating survivors of satanic abuse (pp. 221-241). London, and NY, NY: Routledge.

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Mind Control Documents & Links

December 23, 2008

http://ritualabuse.us/mindcontrol/mc-documents-links/

proof mk-ultra exists

There were several congressional hearings proving that mk-ultra existed. A book was written about  it.

see:
A LOOK AT THE LAW AND GOVERNMENT MIND CONTROL THROUGH FIVE CASES
CIA VS SIMS
UNITED STATES VS STANLEY
ORLIKOW, ET AL VS UNITED STATES
KRONISCH VS UNITED STATES ET AL
HEINRICH, ET AL VS SWEET, ET AL
http://ritualabuse.us/mindcontrol/articles-books/the-law-and-mind-control-a-look-at-the-law-and-goverment-mind-control-through-five-cases/

Declassified MK-Ultra Project Documents:
http://www.michael-robinett.com/declass/c000.htm

MKULTRA Documents
http://www.hiddenmysteries.com/freebook/mk/

http://cryptome.org/mkultra-0001.htm
The Search for the Manchurian Candidate

The CIA and Mind Control  – John Marks
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/lsd/marks.htm

List of MKULTRA Unclassified Documents (including subprojects)
http://nemasys.com/rahome/library/programming/mkultra.shtml

APPENDIX B Documents Referring To Discovery Of Additional MKULTRA Material?
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/history/e1950/mkultra/AppendixB.htm

http://ritualabuse.us/mindcontrol/mc-documents-links/mk-ultra-links-torture-based-government-sponsored-mind-control-experimentation-on-children/

http://ritualabuse.us/mindcontrol/mc-documents-links/cia-mind-control-nazis-mk-ultra-ritual-abuse-information/

The Shock Doctrine – by Naomi Klein – Chapter 1 – The Torture Lab – Ewen Cameron, the CIA and the maniacal quest to erase and remake the human mind.
http://books.google.com/books?id=b1uQNYbE8DkC&printsec=frontcover&dq=isbn:0805079831#PPA25,M1

1995 U. S. congressional hearing:

MKULTRA Victim Testimony A: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iflBkRlpRy0&feature=related

MKULTRA Victim Testimony B: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXDASDDrDkM
MKULTRA Victim Testimony C:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-ES8Bv0_8w

U.S. Supreme Court  CIA v. SIMS, 471 U.S. 159 (1985) 471 U.S. 159 CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ET AL. v. SIMS ET AL.  CERTIORARI TO THE UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA CIRCUIT  No. 83-1075.  Argued December 4, 1984  Decided April 16, 1985 ….Between 1953 and 1966, the Central Intelligence Agency financed a wide-ranging project, code-named MKULTRA, concerned with “the research and development of chemical, biological, and radiological materials capable of employment in clandestine operations to control human behavior.” The [471 U.S. 159, 162]   program consisted of some 149 subprojects which the Agency contracted out to various universities, research foundations, and similar institutions. At least 80 institutions and 185 private researchers participated. Because the Agency funded MKULTRA indirectly, many of the participating individuals were unaware that they were dealing with the Agency.  MKULTRA was established to counter perceived Soviet and Chinese advances in brainwashing and interrogation techniques. Over the years the program included various medical and psychological experiments, some of which led to untoward results. These aspects of MKULTRA surfaced publicly during the 1970’s and became the subject of executive and congressional investigations. http://laws.findlaw.com/us/471/159.html

U.S. Supreme Court UNITED STATES v. STANLEY, 483 U.S. 669 (1987) 483 U.S. 669 UNITED STATES ET AL. v. STANLEY CERTIORARI TO THE UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE ELEVENTH CIRCUIT
No. 86-393. Argued April 21, 1987 Decided June 25, 1987 Respondent, a serviceman, volunteered for what was ostensibly a chemical warfare testing program, but in which he was secretly administered lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) pursuant to an Army plan to test the effects of the drug on human subjects, whereby he suffered severe personality changes that led to his discharge and the dissolution of his marriage. Upon being informed by the Army that he had been given LSD, respondent filed a Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA) suit. The District Court granted the Government summary judgment on the ground that the suit was barred by the doctrine of Feres v. United States, 340 U.S. 135 , which precludes governmental FTCA liability for injuries to servicemen resulting from activity “incident to service.” Although agreeing with this holding, the Court of Appeals remanded the case upon concluding that respondent had at least a colorable constitutional claim under the doctrine of Bivens v. Six Unknown Fed. Narcotics Agents, 403 U.S. 388 , whereby a violation of constitutional rights can give rise to a damages action against the offending federal officials even in the absence of a statute authorizing such relief, unless there are “special factors counselling hesitation” or an “explicit congressional declaration” of another, exclusive remedy. Respondent then amended his complaint to add Bivens claims and attempted to resurrect his FTCA claim. Although dismissing the latter claim, the District Court refused to dismiss the Bivens claims, rejecting, inter alia, the Government’s argument that the same considerations giving rise to the Feres doctrine should constitute “special factors” barring a Bivens action….In February 1958, James B. Stanley, a master sergeant in the Army stationed at Fort Knox, Kentucky, volunteered to participate in a program ostensibly designed to test the effectiveness of protective clothing and equipment as defenses against chemical warfare. He was released from his then-current duties and went to the Army’s Chemical Warfare Laboratories at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds in Maryland. Four times that month, Stanley was secretly administered doses of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), pursuant to an Army plan to study the effects of the drug on human subjects. According to his Second Amended Complaint (the allegations of which we accept for purposes of this decision), as a result of the LSD exposure, Stanley has suffered from hallucinations and periods of incoherence and memory loss, was impaired in his military performance, and would on occasion “awake from sleep at night and, without reason, violently beat his wife and children, later being unable to recall the entire incident.” App. 5. He was discharged from the Army in 1969. One year later, his marriage dissolved because of the personality changes wrought by the LSD. December 10, 1975, the Army sent Stanley a letter soliciting his cooperation in a study of the long-term effects of LSD on “volunteers who participated” in the 1958 tests. [483 U.S. 669, 672] This was the Government’s first notification to Stanley that he had been given LSD during his time in Maryland. After an administrative claim for compensation was denied by the Army, Stanley filed suit under the Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA), 28 U.S.C. 2671 et seq., alleging negligence in the administration, supervision, and subsequent monitoring of the drug testing program. http://laws.findlaw.com/us/483/669.html

Understanding ritual trauma: A comparison of findings from three online surveys

December 23, 2008

http://ritualabuse.us/mindcontrol/eas-studies/understanding-ritual-trauma-a-comparison-of-findings-from-three-online-surveys/

Handout

for

Karriker, Wanda. (2008, November). Understanding ritual trauma: A comparison of findings from three online surveys. Paper presented at the meeting of the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation, Chicago, IL.

A pdf copy of this paper can be received by writing sandime@twave.net

10 Extreme Abuse Survey Findings Helpful to Understanding Ritual Trauma

1. Ritual abuse/mind control (RA/MC) is a global phenomenon.

2. A diagnosis of Dissociative Identity Disorder is common for persons who report histories of

RA/MC. (84% of EAS respondents who answered that they have been diagnosed with DID [N=655] reported that they are survivors of RA/MC).

3. Ritual abuse (RA) is not limited to SRA, i.e., satanic ritual abuse, sadistic abuse, satanist abuse.

4. RA is reported to involve mind control techniques.

5. Some extreme abuse survivors report that they were used in government-sponsored mind control experimentation (GMC).

6. RA/MC is reported to be involved in organized “known” crime.

7. RA/MC is reported to be involved in clergy abuse.

8. Most often reported memories of extreme abuse are similar across all surveys.

9. Most often reported possible aftereffects of extreme abuse are similar across all surveys.

10. In rating the effectiveness of healing methods, therapists tend to favor stabilization techniques; survivors are more open to alternative ways to cope with indoctrinated belief systems.

1. Ritual abuse/mind control (RA/MC) is a global phenomenon.

Extreme Abuse Survey (EAS) for Adult Survivors (An International Online Survey for Adult Survivors of Extreme Abuse) January 1 – March 31, 2007

2337 persons viewed the survey; 1719 in English, 618 in German.

1471 persons answered at least one question on the survey.

31 countries were declared: United States (774); Germany (273); United Kingdom (92); Canada (75); Australia (38); Switzerland (13); Israel (11); Norway (10); Netherlands (8); Austria (8); New Zealand (6); South Africa (6); Greece (5); Sweden (4); Armenia (3); India (3); Spain (2); France (2); Colombia (2); Belgium (1); Bulgaria (1); Czech Republic (1); Ireland (1); Italy (1); Romania (1); China (1); Hong Kong (1); Kyrgzstan (1); Mexico (1); Malaysia (1); Saudi Arabia (1)

124 respondents did not name a country of residence.

1190 respondents gave their primary languages: English (852); German (256); Dutch (21); Norwegian (10); Hebrew (6); French (6); Greek (5); Swedish (4); Italian (3); Spanish (3); Afrikaans (3); Polish (3); Turkish (2); Estonian (2); Tamil (2); Chinese Simplified (2); Romanian (1); Azerbaijani (1); Bengali (1); Georgian (1); Czech (1); Finnish (1); Korean (1); Persian (1); Armenian (1); Pashto (1). 281 respondents did not name their primary languages.

Professional – Extreme Abuse Survey (P-EAS)

(An International Online Survey for Therapists, Counselors, Clergy and Other Persons Who Have Worked Professionally With At Least One Adult Survivor of Extreme Abuse)

April 1, 2007 – June 30, 2007

656 persons viewed the survey; 458 in English, 198 in German.

451 persons answered at least one question on the survey.

20 countries were declared: United States (205); Germany (99); United Kingdom (59); Canada (21); Netherlands (9); New Zealand (4); Switzerland (4); Norway (4); Israel (4); Australia (3); Greece (3); Ireland (2); Philippines (2); Belgium (1); Italy (1); Romania (1); Sweden (1); South Africa (1); Ecuador (1); Hungary (1).

24 respondents did not name a country of residence.

389 respondents gave their primary languages: English (265); Germany (88); Dutch (18); Greek (4); Norwegian (4); Filipino (2); Spanish (2); Hebrew (2); Romanian (1); Hungarian (1); Italian (1); Swedish (1). 62 respondents did not name their primary languages.

Child – Extreme Abuse Survey (C-EAS)

(An International Online Survey for Caregivers of Child Survivors of Ritual Abuse and Mind Control)

July 8, 2007 – October 8, 2007

395 persons viewed the survey; 262 in English, 133 in German.

264 persons answered at least one question on the survey.

19 countries were declared: United States (116); Germany (67); UK (24); Canada (12); Armenia (4); New Zealand (3); France (2); Australia (2); Netherlands (2); Peru (1); Philippines (1); Poland (1); Portugal (1); Switzerland (1); Hungary (1); Israel (1); Turkey (1); Venezuela (1); South Africa (1).

22 respondents did not name a country of residence.

222 respondents gave their primary languages: English (148); German (57); Dutch (6); Spanish (4); Faroese (1); Polish (1); Amharic (1); Hungarian (1); Armenian (1); Afrikaans (1); Frisian (1). 42 respondents did not name their primary languages.


2. A diagnosis of Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) is common for persons who report histories of RA/MC.

EAS: 84% of EAS respondents who answered that they have been diagnosed with DID [N=655]

reported that they are survivors of RA/MC).

P-EAS: 85% of professionals who answered the question answered “yes” to “The majority of

adult RA/MC survivors with whom I have worked have met the diagnostic criteria for (DID).”

C-EAS: 84% of caregivers who answered the question answered “yes” to “Child dissociates when

talking or questioned about abuse.”

74% of caregivers who answered the question said at least one of the children in their care

had received a diagnosis of DID.

3. RA is not limited to SRA, i.e., satanic or sadistic or satanist abuse.

EAS: Numbers in parentheses represent total number of respondents for each category of ritually abusive groups presented on the EAS. Percents represent the frequencies of “yes” responses to each category. (Respondents were not given an opportunity to write in other groups.)

Satanic cult 55% (986)

Gnostic-occult 14% (969)

Child pornography group 48% (977)

Religious sect 39% (993)

*Fascist group 22% (998)

Uncertain ideology 47% (994)

Witchcraft cult 23% (971)

Voodooism 7% (966)

*(group that considers itself superior in race, creed, or origin, e. g., Neo-Nazi, White Supremacist and KKK)

P-EAS: Respondents have worked with survivors who have reported ritual abuse not only in groups named by EAS respondents (above) but also in day-care centers and by polygamist and clergy groups. (Respondents were not given an opportunity to write in other groups.)

C-EAS: In addition to groups named by EAS and P-EAS respondents, children have disclosed to their caregivers that they have been victims of RA/MC by the following perpetrator groups:

Child trafficking group, Fraternal organization, Government-sponsored mind control “experimenters,” Juvenile satanic group, Mainstream religious group, Non government-sponsored mind control “experimenters,” Organized crime group, Organized pedophile group, Private school employees, Public school employees, Santeria group, Vampirism group.

Respondents were given an opportunity to write in other groups and added the following:

Aboriginal witchcraft, Hell’s Angels, Family members, BDSM community, Illuminati, Military, Mormon, Offenders followed ‘Thelema’ and the doctrines of Alistair Crowley, Saturnuskult (Cult of Saturnus), Scout association, US government employees, Whole small towns).


4. RA is reported to involve mind control techniques.

EAS: Respondents were asked to select the category of extreme abuse that best describes their experiences as survivors. 987 persons responded to the question. Listed below are the categories and the number and percent of survivors who chose each category.

Ritual Abuse (RA) ……………………………………. 191 (19%)

Mind Control (MC) …………………………………… 69 (07%)

Ritual Abuse and Mind Control (RA-MC) …………..513 (52%)

Other Extreme Abuse (EA) …………………………..214 (22%)

Number of respondents reported the following experiences with MC:

766 Dealing with programs installed by perpetrators.

848 Possible aftereffects are a result of beliefs indoctrinated by perpetrators.

640 Perpetrator(s) deliberately created/programmed dissociative states of mind (such as

alters, personalities, ego- states) in them.

415 MC programming was used by a handler for blackmail or personal use.

175 Trained to become assassins.

203 Training designed to develop psychic abilities.

P-EAS: Number of respondents who checked each percentage in answering:

“Of individuals reporting memories consistent with RA/MC, I believe that the following percentage actually experienced mind control.”

14 Zero

24 1 to 10%

9 11 to 20%

2 21 to 30%

6 31 to 40%

10 41 to 50%

9 51 to 60%

13 61 to 70%

14 71 to 80%

20 81 to 90%

107 91 to 100%

34 Don’t know

14 No answer

C-EAS: 41(45%) of 92 caregivers who answered the related question said that one or more children for whom they had provided care had reported non-consensual mind control experimentation.

A common mind control technique is called “Don’t Talk; Don’t Tell” Programming.”

EAS: 77% of adult survivors who responded to the related question had been threatened with death if they ever talked about the abuse.

P-EAS: 93% of professionals who responded to the related question had worked with at least

one survivor who had been threatened with death if he or she ever talked about the abuse.

C-EAS 80% of child caregivers who responded to the related question had heard a child say they

had been threatened with death if he or she ever talked about the abuse.

5. Some extreme abuse survivors report that they were used in government-sponsored mind control experimentation (GMC).

EAS: 257 respondents reported that secret mind control experiments were used on them as children.

One of the EAS findings is particularly relevant to anecdotal reports that government experimenters went to the already existing satanic covens to get some of their subjects – children who had already learned the lessons of dissociation.

Of 543 survivors who reported that they had been abused in a satanic cult –

33% or 179

reported being used in secret mind control experiments as children.

Of 257 survivors who reported that secret mind control experiments were used on them as children –

69% or 177

reported abuse in a satanic cult.

See Media Packet on the Presentations section of our website for documentation that torture-based, government-sponsored mind control experimentation was conducted on children during the Cold War.

6. RA/MC is reported to be involved in organized “known” crime.

The analysis below is published in:

Becker, T., Karriker, W., Overkamp, B., & Rutz, C. (2008). The Extreme Abuse Survey: Preliminary findings regarding dissociative identity disorder. In A. Sachs and G. Galton (Eds.), Forensic aspects of dissociative identity disorder (pp. 32-49). London: Karnac.)

Ideologically Motivated Crimes (IMC) Addressed in the Surveys

If perpetrated in ritualistic settings, a sample of 10 identical items from both the EAS and P-EAS and ten similar items from the C-EAS could be classified as ideologically motivated crimes. A statistical analysis of responses across surveys for these items was conducted using chi-square tests. The purpose of this procedure was to determine whether the distribution of “yes,” “don’t know,” and “no” responses was the same for extreme abuse survivors who reported each memory, professionals who have worked with at least one survivor reporting the memory, and caregivers of at least one child survivor of RA/MC who had made a verbal disclosure of the crime. Results indicate statistically significant differences among these groups in the frequencies of reports of these crimes (all p < .01).

Listed below are the total number (N) who responded to these items and the percent of “yes” responses by each survey group. A comparison of these distributions suggests that the main difference in responses across groups is the higher percentages of “yes” responses by professionals. This is a reasonable conclusion given that the majority of P-EAS respondents report having worked with more than one survivor of RA/MC and thus would have more opportunities to hear reports of ideologically motivated crimes.

EAS                      P-EAS          C-EAS

Item                                                                N         %            N     %          N     %

Receiving physical abuse from perpetrators              1093   88          216   97          90   82

Sexual abuse by multiple perpetrators                      1090   82          217   95          91   77

Forced drugging                                                        1077   73          221   88          88   70

Witnessing murder by perpetrators                           1057   56          218   77          96   43

Forced to participate in animal mutilations/killings 1059   55          218   78          92   59

Pornography (child)                                                   1059   55          220   82          83   53

Forced participation in murder by perpetrators         1040   48          220   70          90   42

Prostitution (child)                                                    1045   48          218   77          79   25

Forced impregnation                                                 1041   40          220   71          82   33

Survivor’s own child murdered by his/her perpetrators1021   26   217   55          82   18

7. RA/MC is reported to be involved in clergy abuse.

EAS: 438 respondents reported that at least one spiritual leader was involved in their RA/MC.

P-EAS: Number of respondents (N) who have worked with survivors of RA by clergy and number of persons (n) they have seen:

N n

67 Zero

50 One

59 2 – 10

9 11 – 20

19 More than 20

17 Don’t know

3 No answer

C-EAS: 14 caregivers have heard children mention Catholic priests as perpetrators

16 have heard Protestant clergy mentioned

6 have heard rabbis mentioned

19 have heard other religious leaders mentioned

8. Most often reported memories of extreme abuse are similar across all surveys.

EAS: (1) Receiving physical abuse from perpetrators

(2) Sexual abuse by multiple perpetrators

(3) Other abuses

(4) Being threatened with death if survivor ever talked about the abuse

(5) Witnessing physical abuse by perpetrators on other victims

P-EAS: (1) Receiving physical abuse from perpetrators

(2) Sexual abuse by multiple perpetrators

(3) Being threatened with death if survivor ever talked about the abuse

(4) Incest

(5) Witnessing physical abuse by perpetrators on other victims

C-EAS: (1) Receiving physical abuse/torture from multiple perpetrators

(2) Witnessing physical abuse on other victims

(3) Being threatened with death if survivor ever talked about the abuse

(4) Witnessing sexual abuse on other victims

(5) Sexual abuse by multiple perpetrators

9. Most often reported aftereffects of extreme abuse are similar across all surveys.

EAS: (1) Sleep problems

(2) PTSD

(3) Painful body memories

(4) Unusual fears

(5) Indoctrinated beliefs

P-EAS: (1) PTSD

(2) Sleep problems

(3) Painful body memories

(4) Unusual fears

(5) Self-mutilating behaviors

C-EAS: (1) Nightmares, night terrors

(2) Depression

(3) PTSD

(4) Excessive fears, phobias

(5) Impulse control problems

10. In rating the effectiveness of healing methods, therapists tend to favor stabilization techniques; survivors are more open to alternative ways to cope with indoctrinated belief systems.

From:

Karriker, W. (2008, November). Healing methods: Comparing ratings by trauma survivors and trauma therapists. Poster session presented at the at the annual meeting of the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation, Chicago, IL.)

Significant differences in effectiveness ratings by survivors and by therapists were shown for 43 of the healing methods under study. The largest discrepancies (10+ percentage points) between survivors’ and therapists’ ratings of “much help” or “great help” were on the following items:

EAS: Survivors’ ratings higher: Supportive Friends, Other Method(s), Formal Deprogramming, Theophostic Prayer, Deliverance, Internet Support Group, Reading Survivor Stories, Chiropractic, Exorcism, Reiki, Confronting Abusers, Music Therapy, Energy Therapies, Massage Therapy, Homeopathy, Aromatherapy

P-EAS: Therapists’ ratings higher: Individual Psychotherapy/Counseling, Grounding Techniques, Self-care/Self-soothing Techniques, Supportive Family Members, Non-suicide Contract with Therapist, EMDR, Art Therapy

Individual Psychotherapy/Counseling was rated by both survey groups as most effective; Electroshock Therapy was rated by both groups as least effective.

Related Publications by Extreme Abuse Survey Team Members

Becker, T. (2008). Re-searching for new perspectives: Ritual abuse/ritual violence as ideologically motivated crime. In R. Noblitt & P. Noblitt (Eds.), Ritual abuse in the twenty-first century (pp. 237-260). Bandon, OR: Robert D. Reed.

Becker, T., Karriker, W., Overkamp, B., & Rutz, C. (2008). The Extreme Abuse Survey: Preliminary findings regarding dissociative identity disorder. In A. Sachs and G. Galton (Eds.), Forensic aspects of dissociative identity disorder (pp. 32-49). London: Karnac.

Karriker, W. (2007). Morning, come quickly. (A novel about the aftereffects of extreme child abuse and the resiliency of the human spirit).Catawba, NC: Sandime.

Rutz, C., Becker, T., Overkamp, B., & Karriker, W. (2008). Exploring commonalities reported by adult survivors of extreme abuse: Preliminary empirical findings. (pp. 31-84). In R. Noblitt & P. Noblitt.(Eds.). Ritual abuse in the twenty-first century. Bandon, OR: Robert D. Reed.

Rutz, C. (2001). A nation betrayed: The chilling true story of secret Cold War experiments performed on our children and other innocent people. Grass Lake, MI: Fidelity Publishing.

Website

http://extreme-abuse-survey.net/

On this site are links to the original surveys, to frequencies of responses to every question on each survey, and to publications and presentations based on the survey data.

Contact

Wanda Karriker: sandime@twave.net